Freelancing Topography

JCater Aug 14, 2001

  1. JCater

    JCater TrainBoard Member

    3,199
    8
    49
    How do you guys freelance your scenery? Since I am modeling a specific place (generally, actually...a non-existant part of New Mexico) I try for the feel of the topography by looking at a lot of pictures of the area and using my memory of trips to the region. That and imagination allow for great composits of scenery in small spaces, giving a big feel to the layout. Happy Modeling!!
    John
     
  2. ten87

    ten87 TrainBoard Member

    441
    0
    20
    Good for you! I'm a firm believer in studying the protoype area to get a good feel for the scenery. Here is a web page I did to study the San Timoteo Canyon for a future layout. I spent more time looking at the scenery than I did looking at trains.
     
  3. watash

    watash Passed away March 7, 2010 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

    4,826
    17
    64
    It used to be the practice to lay all the tracks, switches, do wiring, etc, then do the scenery. Quite often in those days, pouring plaster would sometimes cause plaster laden water to go cascading down a canyan or mountain side, pouring out over the track where you didn't see it. Then you had to remove and re-lay track and all the problems.

    Then Model Railroader scolded us and said we were supposed to do the scenery first, then lay track.

    Dad and I sorta stumbled onto doing the roadbed, then scenery, then layed track, then painted scenery and planted trees and houses.

    Since I cancelled my subscription to the MR, I may be behind the times. What is the recommended proceedure today?
     
  4. JCater

    JCater TrainBoard Member

    3,199
    8
    49
    Wayne,
    I think they have gone back to laying roadbed, then track, then scenery!!
    John
     
  5. RevnJeff

    RevnJeff TrainBoard Member

    343
    1
    19
    Since I am modeling mostly urban and prairie, it's pretty easy...make lots of buildings, streets, and flat tall grasslands.

    On the other hand, I have discovered that doing some basic scenery prior to ballasting the track looks much better. This way the ballast lays on the ground instead of the grass on the ballast.

    Then again, on an old less used right of way, you might have grass growing through the ballast.

    Jeff
    Augsburg & Concord R.R.
    (a fictional shortline in Central Illinois)
    http://www.geocities.com/revnjeff/index.html
     
  6. rmathos

    rmathos TrainBoard Member

    130
    0
    20
    First off, Ed: thanks for the arial view of the track-it will help me remember to put in lots of curves and twists even when i have a long straight-away. I am modeling an area i spent lots of years enjoying- both mountains and flatlands, in Arizona. I am going for the "feel" of the topography that reminds ME of what i remember, you know? I have 47' ready of a two track mainline climbing to my second level-i am going to lay cork roadbed on my Celotex subraodbed today, then do some of the cliffwork BEFORE i lay track. I am going to use Bragdon's layered foam technique, and can't wait till track is laid to do it-turn me in to the Model RRer police if you must! P.S.: to Rev-i've been to lots of mountain country in NM, but i sure remember those plains near the Texas panhandle-blow wind blow! Curt
     
  7. JCater

    JCater TrainBoard Member

    3,199
    8
    49
    <blockquote>quote:</font><hr>Originally posted by RevnJeff:
    Since I am modeling mostly urban and prairie, it's pretty easy...make lots of buildings, streets, and flat tall grasslands.

    On the other hand, I have discovered that doing some basic scenery prior to ballasting the track looks much better. This way the ballast lays on the ground instead of the grass on the ballast.

    Then again, on an old less used right of way, you might have grass growing through the ballast.

    Jeff
    Augsburg & Concord R.R.
    (a fictional shortline in Central Illinois)
    http://www.geocities.com/revnjeff/index.html
    <hr></blockquote>

    Jeff,
    I could'nt agree more about basic scenicing before ballast!! In fact, I will ofen scenic just on either side of the track so that I can get the ballast laid, then go back later to finish the scene. Happy Modeling!!
    John
     
  8. JohnC

    JohnC TrainBoard Member

    66
    0
    19
    I've probably used a combination of the two methods...

    Since, I'm modeling eastern New England where I live, I had an idea of what I wanted before I started. Where the river valley is, I cut the foam down to my plywood base and built up nearby hills. After that, I fit the track into the valley as though it is following the river. In other areas, where I didn't have anything in concrete yet, I left it blank.

    John


    John
     

Share This Page