"N SCALE" and "N GAUGE"

maxairedale Feb 2, 2010

  1. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    I agree, but I don't agree with your point that N-gauge track used in a 1:148 scale ratio looks anything like narrow gauge modeling. It scales out to over 52 inches, really close to 56.5 inch standard gauge.
     
  2. alister

    alister TrainBoard Member

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    I am in agreement with this but I still can't agree with N gauge meaning narrow gauge.
    N gauge is only 9mm (this is all it means) , any narrow gauge designation is a function of scale and not of gauge.
     
  3. alister

    alister TrainBoard Member

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    Well I guess it may not look narrow gauge to you but it is narrower than std gauge so that is designated narrow gauge.
     
  4. Inkaneer

    Inkaneer TrainBoard Member

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    Technically there is no N scale. It is N gauge representing the Nine mm track gauge. The scale can differ from 1:48 -1:160 as we have seen expressed here. As for narrow gauge any scale's narrow gauge is usually written with a lower case "n" as in HOn30 signifying 30inch narrow guage 1:87 models. By the way the same problem exists in "G" Gauge where 45 mm or about 1.75 inches, is the one consistency but the scale can be from 1:22.5 or 1:20.3, 1:32 or 1:24. All use G gauge [45mm] track.
     
  5. Metro Red Line

    Metro Red Line TrainBoard Member

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    This should clear it up for everyone:

    capital "N" = The 9mm track width

    lower case "n" = Narrow gauge
     
  6. jagged ben

    jagged ben TrainBoard Member

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    Doug has it all correct. I tweaked his quote just a bit to improve it. (Bracketed phrases, sentence order.)

    (I do believe Japanese manufacturers use a couple different scales, but most stuff is indeed 1:150)

    Most of the rest of this thread is just sowing confusion, if I may say so. Too much misinformation for me to spend time correcting.
     
  7. wcfn100

    wcfn100 TrainBoard Member

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    In the programming world, you would describe this as an 'is a' relationship like a square 'is a' rectangle. You could also use a Venn diagram that shows an 'N scale' circle inside an 'N gauge' circle.

    Anything N scale can be referred to as N gauge. It just doesn't work the other way.

    I'm not saying I think it's proper, but that doesn't make it incorrect.

    Let's just call it 'non-standard' like the word 'irregardless'.


    Jason
     
  8. Metro Red Line

    Metro Red Line TrainBoard Member

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    That depends on what's being modeled. Freight trains, most model automobiles and such are 1:150; Shinkansen (Bullet train) models are 1:160.
     
  9. maxairedale

    maxairedale TrainBoard Member

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    I am going to accept that "N Gauge" does not mean "Narrow Gauge" and that it refers to the track gauge, but I am also going to stand on my statement that when the term "N Gauge" is used it does not automatically mean "N Scale".

    Gary
     
  10. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    I don't think anyone disagrees with this one.

    :tb-biggrin::tb-biggrin:
     
  11. maxairedale

    maxairedale TrainBoard Member

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    If there is no N Scale how do you explain all the locomotives, rolling stock, buildings and other items that I have purchased for the last 26 years that are labeled N Scale? What have I been purchasing?

    Gary
     
  12. oldrk

    oldrk TrainBoard Supporter

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    I believe some of the above is accurate while some isnt......
     
  13. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    I believe there is an N scale, it's just that it's interpreted at slightly different ratios in different parts of the world.
     
  14. maxairedale

    maxairedale TrainBoard Member

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    Originally Posted by maxairedale [​IMG]
    ...but I am also going to stand on my statement that when the term "N Gauge" is used it does not automatically mean "N Scale".
    Thank you.

    Now here is what pushed me over the edge and started all of this.
    "I have modified an N gauge 2 x 8 layout I found on the Layout Depot using RTS8."
    The above was posted on TrainBoard. I do not mean to embarrass the author of the post so I will not give the forum name or topic.

    Can anyone tell me from that statement what scale is being modeled? To me it meant that the author is going to use the track that is standard gauge for "N Scale" but because he or she was using the term "N Gauge" that he or she was using locomotives and rolling stock from a scale larger then N Scale thus making a narrow gauge railroad. Maybe I read to much between the lines.

    Gary
     
  15. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    I understand being pushed over the edge, Gary. I see errors with apostrophes, the use of the wrong their/there/they're, the use of the wrong your/you're, non-words like
    "irregardless" and so on on signs and in print all the time, and they all grate a bit, but I also know that people don't use the wrong "they're/their/there" just to get under my skin.

    If I were to be really technical, a 2x8 N gauge layout to me would mean a 2 foot by 8 foot (or, not as likely, 2 meters by 8 meters) layout using track of Nine millimeter gauge. If that person were to post such a thing in a forum titled "N Scale" I would then assume, I think pretty safely, that we are being told about a 1:160 (or, possibly, a 1:148 or 1:150 or 1:172) scale layout. If you think this is bad, look at what the one-gaugers ("G" scale) have to put up with.

    I don't think I would assume narrow gauge unless that person also mentioned a scale much closer in ratio to HO (1:87). A 1:148 N-gauge layout would really just be a 52.5 inch gauge model. The difference is even more negligible between this and the 1:160 interpretation than your comparison between the stated and actual gauge common in Nn3 modeling.

    Adam
     
  16. Grey One

    Grey One TrainBoard Supporter

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    Being a wordsmith, poet, individual and commited neologist I personally support any use of a word or phrase which successfully communicates a concept.

    Yes, standards are important for the sake of general communications. Still I believe there exceptions to the rule. Anyone able to read these forums is - probably - fully capable of inferring from context what is intended. If they can't they should feel comfortable asking for clarification.

    Gauge / scale - Turnout / switch - Tomato / tommato
     
  17. Stourbridge Lion

    Stourbridge Lion TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yesterday I couldn't spell engineer, today I are one

    I assm tht flks can also read ths wo much ffrt evn tho mst wrds are nt splld out eithr or r mss splld

    :tb-wink: :tb-wink: :tb-wink: :tb-wink:​
     
  18. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    That's why I now use square and rectangle interchangeably!

    :tb-wink:
     
  19. Mark Watson

    Mark Watson TrainBoard Member

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    My thoughts exactly!!

    People make mistakes, are not educated equally to others, have hard time typing, and or have hard times formulating thoughts to words. We're ALL HUMAN!

    As said above.. "Anyone able to read these forums is - probably - fully capable of inferring from context what is intended. If they can't they should feel comfortable asking for clarification."
     
  20. Mark Watson

    Mark Watson TrainBoard Member

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    Also, what annoys me is when someone feels the need to draw attention to one of these minor mistakes. so what if the first letter of this sentence is not capitalized? Is it really worth your time and effort to point that mistake out?

    It sure as heck is not worth my time to have to read your call on my simple error, so just leave it be.
     

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