Pleasant Valley Locomotive Works Erecting Shop

CNE1899 Oct 7, 2021

  1. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Well, looks like I'm starting another project, even though I haven't finished any of the others I've started.:rolleyes:

    I have been building locomotive chassis by modifying Marklin chassis.
    https://www.trainboard.com/highball/index.php?threads/pleasant-valley-locomotive-works.134863/
    I now want a place to store, exhibit, and photograph them.
    Since I was going to document the modification and building process, I thought it might be nice to have the locomotives in an erecting shop.
    I decided since most of my locomotive are Baldwin's, and I found some good photos of BLW's erecting shop, that I was going to use that as the basis of my build.
    I plan on using wood, paper, card stock, and some metal. The diorama will have a cover that latches to the base and have a handle for carrying.
    Below is a quick sketch.
    Scott
    PVLW_Sketch.jpg
    BaldwinLocomotiveWorks_100TonCrane_ErectingFloor_1896.jpg
     
  2. SJ Z-man

    SJ Z-man TrainBoard Member

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    I love your ‘pencil-CAD’
    This is how many of the European train magazines show their modules and layouts (with added colors, of course)
     
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  3. mdvholland

    mdvholland TrainBoard Member

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    Hi Scott, "Rimkov" might provide some inspiration:



    Matt
     
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  4. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Jeff,
    Thanks! I enjoy doing perspective.
    Matt,
    Thanks for the video! Wow, talk about modeling! Lots of different techniques used there.

    Scott
     
  5. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Okay,
    So the first step for me is to figure out scale and create some patterns. Some things I'll cut by hand, some with a Cricut.
    I'm using Illustrator and I'm also using a drawing of my Z scale 2-8-0 to set the scale. I'm measuring everything in the same plan as the locomotive, and using the 50 inch drivers to determine measurements.
    Scott
    PVLW.jpg
     
  6. rray

    rray Staff Member

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    Nice project!
     
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  7. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Robert,
    Thanks for your interest.
    This will be my first building for model railroads. I just hope I can come close to your level of modeling.

    Scott
     
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  8. rray

    rray Staff Member

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    You can do anything I can and even exceed if you put your mind to it. The best advice I can give is to examine old photos, and try to represent everything you can. Don't focus on exact duplication, rather representation. So you can either draw up 3D details for resin printing, or like I did, buy the smaller N Scale shop equipment to fit. Represent lot's of piping and plumbing by different gauges of wire. Lot's of ladders around too. That overhead crane on tracks can be represented by cutting up an undec MTL gondola, and wire and stuff. Model tech studios makes lots of great usable N details. An N steam donkey boiler can be your steam boiler for the shop, just take it off the pullies and skids, and use those parts to represent other stuff around the shop. It's all in good fun, trying to use parts of details cut up to represent other details.
     
  9. husafreak

    husafreak TrainBoard Member

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    Best advice ever for a scale modeler trying to do the impossible...
     
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  10. Zscaleplanet

    Zscaleplanet TrainBoard Supporter

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    Scott,
    What are the dimensions of these walls. Noted, you will only have three to contend with, assuming one side is open for display. Possible to cut them in laserboard using a desktop laser cutter.

    Also, the windows could be robbed from a MIKE BASHER - SAWTOOTH WAREHOUSE KIT. They are fantastic in detail and would suffice for this project.

    Lance
     
  11. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Lance
    The walls are going to be two 1/8 thick pieces. They are about 8 1/2 inches long by 1 5/8 high.
    I was planning on making them out of masonite or foam core.
    Thanks for the suggestions.

    Scott
     
  12. Zscaleplanet

    Zscaleplanet TrainBoard Supporter

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    Was curious of the dimension because I was thinking with an outline of the walls themselves, we could use my laser cutter too quickly and accurately cut them. Granted the laser cutter I am using is not the super high-end stuff that Basher or others are using. But it sufficiently does the job and quite well I might add with some minor modifications.

    The cutting platform of my laser cutter though seems to be limited to about 6” x 7”, may be 8” max.

    However, is it a safe assumption that the shop you work in, also has cutting capabilities???
     
  13. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Lance,
    I appreciate the offer. It may be possible to still fit on your platform. If you notice the wall has a section without arches, that section was going to be a storage area for containers holding the locomotives. The walls can be cut in sections so they fit on the platform.

    Scott
     
  14. Zscaleplanet

    Zscaleplanet TrainBoard Supporter

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    Scott,
    Here is an initial attempt at the lower side walls I did using card stock. They measure 2”X6”. I was taking a guess at the dimensions and window spacing based on the pictures you sent. Granted your overall length may be 8” to 10” inches so wall panels could be joined together. Spacing between the windows is probably a bit tight for these samples but the dimensions could be adjusted. And then of course we can add brickwork.

    Again my laser cutter is nothing fancy. Just a simple desktop ORTUR unit.

    The upper portion of the wall with the square windows could easily be cut along with these lowers. I simply did the lowers to see how well they would come out especially with that arch. So again one complete wall could be done and the dimensions on my laser platform would handle it. But if the links needs to be longer than it would require two panels be cut and joined.

    BBE9D2EE-BD93-461B-8BB0-E7635E56ECEF.jpeg

    9A6CBE2E-3338-4826-B94D-24959E00F8C7.jpeg

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    EFFBF024-153B-4284-8908-A3961248ABDF.jpeg

    4056AD8C-C634-4B0C-82C1-718C7F90B9BD.jpeg

    E8575AEF-3A30-4B87-8B1E-C4340DBC653B.jpeg

    ECF7676E-28D8-44E5-B4A2-90AB0275518C.jpeg

    D75964ED-8633-4EA8-96CB-DF5D7D308356.jpeg
     
  15. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    Lance,
    Very nice! Thanks for your assistance. What kind of file does your laser require?
    Also, can your laser cut 1/8 inch laser board?

    Scott
     
  16. Zscaleplanet

    Zscaleplanet TrainBoard Supporter

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    I am using the software program LIGHTBURN. It’s not a bad program. Probably not the best but not bad for a rank amateur like me. And the yearly subscription cost is modest.

    It accepts the following: AI, PDF, SVG, DXF, PLT, PNG, JPG, GIF, BMP

    Now as for what thicknesses of laser board I could cut through, I am not sure. For instants the dock I attached to the sawtooth warehouse was .025 thick. And it took about three or four passes. But I’m not so sure they make laser board in 1/8. One may be forced to use some sort of wood product like birch.

    Granted you need that extra wall thickness based on the overhead gantry support I see in the pic. But it might be possible to use the .025 laser board as an exterior wall, and you glue that on to the interior wall. Basically a wall covering on the exterior side.

    Shoot me and IM with your phone number and we can chat about this at length.
     
  17. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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  18. Zscaleplanet

    Zscaleplanet TrainBoard Supporter

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    Hmmm, interesting. This appears to be more MDF than LASERBOARD (although the industry name is POLYBAK, not laserboard) but hard to even say what the actual material differences would be. It would be worth a try to cut the 1/8" thick stuff. May take 4-6 passes at full laser power, whereas .025 POLYBAK takes about 3.

    The AMPERSAND named produces is formaldehyde-free, which is important for laser cutting. Price is reasonable as well.
     
  19. SJ Z-man

    SJ Z-man TrainBoard Member

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    Lance, attach a ShopVac to the bottom (under) the egg-crate to hold the material down. Maybe cot a sub-plate with ~2” holes in the corner regions to help draw the corners down (keeping the laser in focus).

    nice Maker kludge you have there! Seeing lots more low cost jigs popping up, although many reviews comment on far less than what the claim. Glad yours is giving you the start!
     
  20. Zscaleplanet

    Zscaleplanet TrainBoard Supporter

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    This is actually a poor man’s attempt at a hobby laser unit. These open desktop lasers are great but they’re not contained and can be dangerous to the eyes. So I built the box you see in order to contain the laser light. I have yet to put a plexiglass laser applicable cover on top. Still working on getting that ordered. There is also a door that magnetically attaches to the front. Once I put the top on this unit will be self-contained and much safer than an open desk unit.

    I have attached a small exhaust fan on the rear to pull out any smoke from the work area. I have also added air assist as well.

    In the attached pics, you picked up on the card stock test samples I was doing and noted the edges were lifted. I actually weight the material down before I cut it. For the pictures above, I removed the small weights I use. A shop vac underneath would certainly serve the same purpose. But I have had no issues with anything lifting—yet!

    Overall this ORTUR unit does pretty well. As you can see by the sawtooth warehouse review, I built the entire dock out of POLYBAK material and this laser cutter. And it all fit very accurately and the brick work came out fantastic. So the investment was well worth it, although I am still experimenting with it.

    This unit is great but it really does not hold a candle to the high end or pricier equipment. It’s a basic get you by for someone on a fixed budget.
     
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