4-8-0 "Mastodon" Wheel Arangement

Panthera Pardus Mar 10, 2008

  1. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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    Quotes From Wikipedia:


    Mastodon (steam locomotive)


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    Mastodon [​IMG]
    A modified image of El Gobernador as a 4-8-0. The two locomotives were nearly identical but no image of Mastodon has yet been located. Power type Steam Builder Central Pacific's Sacramento, California, shops Serial number 20 Build date April 1882 Configuration 4-8-0 Gauge 4 ftin (1,435 mm) (standard gauge) Driver size 55 in dia Weight on drivers 81,000 lb Locomotive weight 105,850 lb Boiler pressure 135 psi Cylinder size 19 in dia × 30 in stroke Tractive effort 22,595 lbf Career Central Pacific,
    Southern Pacific Number 229; renum. 1950 in 1891; renum. 2800 in 1901; renum. 2925 in 1906 Nicknames Mastodon First run April 1882 Scrapped June 29, 1935, Brooklyn shops, Portland, Oregon Mastodon was the unofficial name of the Central Pacific Railroad's number 229, the world's first successful 4-8-0 steam locomotive.

    History and career

    The engine was designed and built by the road's master mechanic, Andrew Jackson "A.J" Stevens at Sacramento Locomotive Works in 1882. After being readied for its initial shakedown run, the engine met with a minor mishap in which its large "balloon" stack was knocked away from the boiler. During all the careful preparations, apparently nobody noticed that the stack was nearly a foot taller than the doors to the roundhouse.
    The problem was fixed and an impressive series of trials on the steep grades of the Sierra Nevada Mountains soon followed, in which it easily outperformed the smaller 4-4-0 and 4-6-0 engines used by the railroad in those days. Later, Mastodon was sent east to the Cooke Locomotive Works, along with blueprints and men who had built the engine, where more than 20 copies were produced. The success of this engine inspired railroad president Leland Stanford to instruct Stevens to build an even larger locomotive, which would be the largest the world had ever seen up until that time. This engine, a 4-10-0 named El Gobernador (CPRR #237), looked virtually identical to Mastodon, with the exception of being longer and having an additional pair of driving wheels. Unfortunately, this engine, unlike its predecessor, was doomed to failure.
    Sometime in the early 20th century, No. 229 (now renumbered as Southern Pacific 2925) was converted from wood to oil-firing and was later assigned to the Oregon lines. Despite its historical significance, the engine was broken up for scrap at the Brooklyn Shops in Portland, Oregon, in the mid-1930s.


    4-8-0


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    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Norfolk and Western Railway class M2 4-8-0.


    Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, a 4-8-0 locomotive has four leading wheels, eight coupled driving wheels and no trailing wheels. The type was nicknamed the Mastodon or Twelve-wheeler in North America. Mastodon (No. 229) was the unofficial name of the very first 4-8-0, which was built by the Central Pacific Railroad in 1882 at the Sacramento Locomotive Works.
    In the United States the 4-8-0 was essentially a freight locomotive - a marginal devleopment of the 2-8-0. Most US 4-8-0s were built in the late 19th century or early 20th century, but the type never achieved great popularity. The wide-firebox 2-8-2 Mikado had much more potential as far as speed but the Norfolk & Western's 4-8-0s needed the short wheelbase and 4 wheel lead or engine truck for stability and the ability to have over 90 percent of the engines weight on the drivers. N&W's 4-8-0s were the largest built and many lasted into the 1950s. One was even converted into a high availability-low maintenance automatic type locomotive. In continental Europe, notably France and Austria, the type was used for heavy passenger work. In Britain the type was use in small numbers for shunting tanks.
    Other equivalent classifications are:
    UIC classification: 2D (also known as German classification and Italian classification)
    French classification: 240
    Turkish classification: 46
    Swiss classification: 4/6

    In the United Kingdom, there were two classes of 4-8-0 tank locomotives, both built for hump shunting. Fifteen were built by the North Eastern Railway, designated NER Class X, later LNER Class T1. These had three cylinders, following Robinson's 0-8-4 design for the Great Central. The London and South Western Railway also built a class of four two-cylinder machines to Urie's design for Feltham marshalling yards. The Great Southern and Western Railway in Ireland similarly had a small class of inside-cylinder shunting machines .
    Both the London Midland and Scottish Railway and the Southern Railway however contemplated 4-8-0 tender freight engines, but these never materialised.[1]
    In Austria, the wheel arrangement was used for some express locomotives: class 570 of 1915 and class 113 of 1923, both numbered as class 33 from 1938 on.
    Contents

    [hide] Australia

    The 4-8-0 saw service in Australia from 1900.
    In Tasmania the private railway company of Emu Bay ordered 4 of these 4-8-0 tendered locomotives for their narrow (1,066mm) gauge system. In 1910 another locomotive was delivered from the now reformed North British Coy. Two examples of these engines are preserved.
    Initially designed in South Australia for use on its narrow gauge 3ft 6 ins (1,066mm) system, a new class of 4-8-0 engine proved suitable workhorses and by 1917 there were seventy eight locomotives in the class. During 1922-23 five of the class were converted to state's broad gauge system (1,600mm) and then reconverted during 1949 back to narrow gauge. In 1921-22 the Tasmanian Government purchased six of the SAR narrow gauged engines. During the Second World War the Commonwealth Railways also obtained four SAR narrow gauge locomotives for a period. Several ex-SAR engines are preserved.
    In Queensland the QR which also operates a narrow gauge system a 4-8-0 class was introduced in 1903 as C16 class locomotives. A total of 152 engines were in service by 1917. During the Second World War (1939-45) the Commonwealth Government acquired eleven C16s on loan. Only one example of this class was preserved. From 1920, as the Queensland 4-8-0s acquired super heaters they were classed as C17 - and all up 227 engines were in this class. The Commonwealth Railways also ordered 22 engines of the same class for their narrow gauge rail system. Twenty examples of the class are preserved.
    In 1922 the QR ordered 22 new 4-8-0s as class 19 engines. (all Australian details: Oberg)

    France

    In France this wheel arrangement appeared as the famous 240P, 2-4-0 referring to the number and arrangement of axles rather than wheels. These machines were technically rebuilds of some of the earliest Pacifics in Europe, built for the Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléans. The 240P was considered to be one of André Chapelon's finest works and benefited from his thorough understanding of thermodynamics and his appreciation of the need to consider the entirety of the steam circuit. The locomotive was a 4 cylinder compound fitted with Lentz-Dabeg poppet valves. With a power output of 4,700 kilowatts (6,302.80 hp) the 240P was reported to have the highest power to weight ratio of any steam locomotive. Discussion continues as to how robust they were mechanically - whether the size of the bearings was too near the bone, or whether they were simply worked to death during the difficult war years. Coupled with the elegant French style tender the second batch at least was also a very aesthetic locomotive. Unfortunately none have survived into preservation.

    South Africa


    Soviet Union

    In Soviet Union 4-8-0 were the first passenger locomotives built by the new state. They were represented by one hundred M-class locomotives built by Putilov Works in Leningrad (Saint Peterburg) in 1927. Initially built as a 3-cylinder machines they were later rebuilt as a 2-cylinder ones and redesignated as Mr. The M series were not considered a great success, and the are not to be confused with Norfolk & Western's successful M class 4-8-0 (See "4-8-0 475").

    And the best of all...



    SNCF 240P

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    SNCF 240.P Power type Steam Designer André Chapelon Driver size 1.9m (74.75 in) Length 20.79 m (68 ft 2½ in) Axle load 20 t (44,000 lb) Weight on drivers 80.5 t (755,500 lb) Locomotive weight 136.5 t (301,000 lb) Tender capacity 12t (26,500 lb) coal
    34,000 L (9,000 USgal) Boiler pressure 2.00 MPa (290 psi) Fire grate area 3.75 m² (40 ft²) Heating surface: Total 213 m² (2,290 ft²) Superheater area 68 m² (733 ft²) High-pressure
    cylinder size 420×650 mm
    (16.5×25.6 in) Low-pressure
    cylinder size 650×690 mm
    (25.2×27.2 in) Power output 4,000 cylinder hp The SNCF 240P class was a group of 37 4-8-0 steam locomotives designed by André Chapelon, and regarded by some, as one of his best designs.
    They started life as Chemin de Fer de Paris à Orléans (Paris-Orleans Railway) 4500 class 4-6-2s before being rebuilt. The new boiler with the long, narrow Belpaire firebox came from the Nord "Super Pacifics". With all the pipes, domes, and pumps, these were double-chimneyed, husky looking locomotives of very different appearance than the Pacifics.

    Use

    These 4-8-0s were created to tackle the gradients of the line to Toulouse, steeper than those to Bordeaux. The intention was to provide one-third more adhesive weight than the 4500s. On level ground, they could manage 28 coaches at 53mph (85km/h).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 11, 2008
  2. Jerry M. LaBoda

    Jerry M. LaBoda TrainBoard Supporter

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    "but no image of Mastodon has yet been located."

    Would this count...
    http://www.tcsn.net/charlied/charlie11.jpg

    Personally I wish that one of the N&W Mollies could be done but honestly they were a little underweight to match a medium sized Consol., with the M2s being equal to a medium weight, superheated 2-8-0. (Boy... would I ever love to get my hands on a couple without spending most of a year's wages!!!)
     
  3. Ed M

    Ed M Passed away May 2012 In Memoriam

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    The articles above don't seem to mention it (or maybe I'm just too tired to read clearly) but NdeM had several 4-8-0's too. Unfortunately none survived the torch.

    Regards

    Ed
    .
     
  4. Triplex

    Triplex TrainBoard Member

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    Weren't the Mexican 4-8-0s the last built in North America?
     
  5. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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  6. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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  7. N&W

    N&W TrainBoard Member

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    The Wiki quoted above fails to mention that N&W had two kinds of 4-8-0s. The largest ones were the M2 class (the smaller version was M and M1).

    N&W 475 at Strasburg is an M class.
     
  8. Frank Campagna

    Frank Campagna TrainBoard Member

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    If I recall, 4-8-0's were the backbone of Jersey Central's freight power pre World War I, they were replaced by 2-8-2's.

    Frank
     
  9. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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    Argentina used some of the 11C and 15B classes. South Africa also had the Class 7 and 8.
     
  10. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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    NzR Bb class.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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  12. Triplex

    Triplex TrainBoard Member

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    I was wondering when you were going to mention the East African Railways engines... :D
     
  13. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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    Skip to 6:01.

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9Dl7V_4QFY&feature=related"][Link][/ame]
     
  14. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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  15. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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    Here's where the wheel arrangement got its name!



    [​IMG]
     
  16. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    Here is an N Scale 4-8-0 that I kit bashed out of a Bachmann Consolidation. It is an N&W train that is kind of lost somehow and made it to Texas.
    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORlcJOFvoUo"]YouTube- N&W M Class 4-8-0[/ame]
     
  17. Stourbridge Lion

    Stourbridge Lion TrainBoard Supporter

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    D&H#1403

    [​IMG]
     
  18. Panthera Pardus

    Panthera Pardus TrainBoard Member

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    Oh yeah, the D&H engine...only 4-8-0 to be built with a superheater!
     
  19. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    And Four (4) Cylinders.......:tb-cool:
     
  20. Odd-d

    Odd-d TrainBoard Member

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    You all seem to have missed my three favorite Mastodons, the Monon series, The 1890s era SP 4-8-0s and my all time favorite Chicago & North Western narrow gauge 4-8-0s....yes, the C&NW ran at least two separate unconnected narrow gauge lines in Wisconsin and South Dakota. odd-d
     

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