Air compressor question

Traindork Mar 28, 2022

  1. Traindork

    Traindork TrainBoard Member

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    I need to buy an air compressor for the garage. I'm thinking one of those smaller 2 gallon size ones, good for inflating tires, or running a nail gun.
    Question is, are those types of compressors usable with an air brush? I'm itching to buy one, and am hoping I don't need to buy a different compressor for it.
     
  2. mtntrainman

    mtntrainman TrainBoard Supporter

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    As long as it has a water trap and a regulator that will get down to the 8-15 lb range you should be good. IMHO
     
  3. MRLdave

    MRLdave TrainBoard Member

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    I use mine that way, and the only issue is having to change the regulator back and forth for tires and the air brush.......been thinking of putting a T in the line so I have one leg regulated and one leg full power. Not a big deal really, but the compressor is under the bench, so I have to get down on hands and knees to do it. Like mtntrainman said, regulator and water trap needed. A lot of airbrush compressors are way quieter, but hey.....you're in the garage, who cares, and I can airbrush for quite a while before the compressor kicks back on and runs for 30 to 40 seconds.
     
    Doug Gosha likes this.
  4. sidney

    sidney TrainBoard Member

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    bigger is way better but that's me a small compressor will not run a nail gun well at all. air guns need lots of volume IE 50/100 gallon tanks. good regulator with water trap would work for air brush as long as its an adjustable one....
     
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  5. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    To operate a nail gun and impact wrench I needed a much larger unit. Instead of just a T with regulator and water trap, I fill a small tank at the low pressure with it's own regulator for the paint sprayer and small air tools. The pancake compressors used by contractors is much quiter than most usual ones. And more stabile.
    Or just get a small air brush with built in compressor with batteries. You can get rechargeable batteries these days.
     
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  6. mtntrainman

    mtntrainman TrainBoard Supporter

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    I know a guy..........

    Well I read about a guy.......who has a small hobby painting booth with wooden legs. He put together a nifty setup (jig) attached to one of those legs. It consisted of >>> A male quick disconnect threaded into a water trap with a small nipple coming out of it...and into a small regulator with a female quick disconnect at the output end. All this was attached to the paint booth leg. He had his airbrush hose with a male disconnect on the end that went into the end of the female disconnect coming out of his jig. He would turn the air compressor output down to about 20-25. He would snap the female disconnect on his air compressor hose to the inlet side of this jig. Adjusting the regulator after the water trap on his jig to the correct air pressure for air brushing. When he was done he just disconnected his air compressor quick disconnect at the inlet to his jig and could then use it for other stuff.

    It looked pretty kewl and obviously worked... (y)(y)
    .
     
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  7. hawkdriver

    hawkdriver TrainBoard Supporter

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    A 2 gallon compressor will be useful to inflate tires and maybe power a real small brad gun.........period.
    For nail guns, or even airbrushing, go as large as the pocketbook will allow.
    40 gallon on two wheels would be good for what you are after.
    I use a 50 gallon and it would really surprise you how quickly a full tank of air at 120 psi is depleted airbrushing.
    Metered down to 15-20 psi it goes quite fast.
    Also, plan on a decent regulator and one or two dryer/traps.
     
    Doug Gosha likes this.
  8. Traindork

    Traindork TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks for the tips. My son has a 50 gallon compressor that he was keeping here, but now it's gone. About all I ever used it for was adding air to my tires. I miss having it around. The thought of paying $1.50 for air at a gas station just rubs me the wrong way. I must be getting old.
     
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  9. hawkdriver

    hawkdriver TrainBoard Supporter

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    Getting old??.....no, thinking smart!
    Both you and I remember when almost any gas station had an air dock/terminal, and air was free.
    BTW........tell the kid to bring back the compressor......
     
  10. Allen H

    Allen H TrainBoard Supporter

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    This is what I use for airbrushing, filling tires and running my brad and nail guns with my business. They work great!
    This will even operate the big 16d framing guns, although it'll have to recharge the air a little more often.
    Good Lord, you don't need 50/100 gallon tanks...unless you're planning on doing a major framing job??? :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

    https://www.cpooutlets.com/porter-c...ee-pancake-air-compressor/pcbnc2002-ecom.html
     
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  11. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    As Gomer said in Mayberry, "Air and water are free. We don't make a charge for it. Now gas and oil, that's a whole different proposition, entirely. We make a charge for that.

    :D

    Doug
     
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  12. in2tech

    in2tech TrainBoard Member

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    Only forum or Discord I know where Gomer get quoted. Black & White television anyone? And being the youngest of six kid's, I always had to hold the antenna using my body to make the antenna stronger for a better picture. Man those were the days of technology :) I remember watching The Wild Wild West one day and a gentleman delivered a color television set and all of a sudden it was in Color, mind was blown :)
     
  13. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    I had the big ones in the garage and then one of these to do work out of my truck. It's a lot more quiet, portable and rugged. I also carried a generator for it and all the electric tools.
     
    Allen H likes this.
  14. porkypine52

    porkypine52 TrainBoard Member

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    I've got one of those 50 gal. animals. Very happy with it. Can turn it on, wait for it to charge itself up and go! Harbor Freight sold me the adjustable regulator, water trap and filter. I plumbed my basement with COPPER lines and have an outlet in the garage. Plenty of air for my pneumatic tools, airbrushes and inflation duties. Every so often I drain the water in the tank blow out the lines. I had smaller compressors, but with this big animal, why bother? Also some people use PVC plastic pipe for air lines, instead of copper lines: DON'T DO THIS! If a PVC line fails, it can explode with PVC shards flying like schrapnal.
     
    BoxcabE50 likes this.
  15. Shortround

    Shortround TrainBoard Member

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    It would be like being in combat. :eek:
     
  16. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yikes!!! Using plastic pipe would be a huge mistake!
     
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  17. Metro Red Line

    Metro Red Line TrainBoard Member

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    I have a 2-gallon Coleman air compressor. It's got a pressure regulator valve and moisture trap. I think it's perfectly fine for model airbrushing. I bought it in near-mint condition for $20 off of someone on my local Craigslist who only used it to inflate basketballs.
     
  18. porkypine52

    porkypine52 TrainBoard Member

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    YES Check CRAIGSLIST for somebody who has upgraded their compressor and wants to sell their old one. Usually get a good buy and Harbor Freight, Home Depot, Lowes,and Menards have the fittings. For INDUSTRIAL USE [heavy duty] type fittings, go to GRAINGER'S.
     

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