1. jnevis

    jnevis TrainBoard Supporter

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    I like the latest one best. It is more what you'd actually see. It'll be a little bigger than originally planned for but still fairly small and easy to move around. Actually, if you built it right it would be a good (wide) T-Track module. http://www.t-trak.org/
     
  2. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Candy, your latest looks more interesting and versatile. Of course, as modelers, we feel that the tracks should ALWAYS be in front for top billing, but merged between buildings is how they actually are in towns, and how the public usually sees them.

    Someone here may be able to put you onto an inexpensive track planning program that includes buildings and 3-D viewing capability. That would really make your concepts come to reality...or give you an OOOPS moment, resulting in a complete redo.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 21, 2010
  3. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    Yes it is! Thank you everyone!
     
  4. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    I drew it out on graph paper... one inch squares.. and I used the foot prints of the buildings to make sure the buildings were in scale. It should all fit.....I hope
     
  5. jnevis

    jnevis TrainBoard Supporter

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    While it may not be totally 3d, the Atlas RTS 8.0 track planning software does have 2D wire drawings of a decent selection of DPM, Walthers, Atlas, and Model Power structures. http://www.atlasrr.com/righttrack.htm It's pretty simple to use.
     
  6. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    My concern, as well as Darren's (Stourbridge Lion), is the radius (curvature) and length of the switches. Also, as I'm sure you're already aware, there are different designs of switches between manufacturers, and sometimes within a single manufacturer. You need to consider what switch design you want to use, #4, #6, #8 are the most common. One manufacturer makes a #5, and Peco calls theirs Short, Medium, and Long. All of this defines the length and radius dimensions of each switch design.

    I don't know if the various manufacturers (Atlas, Peco, Kato, ME, etc.) have their switch dimensions available for download from their websites. Perhaps another TB member may know. But the dimension differences can be significant.
     
  7. Stourbridge Lion

    Stourbridge Lion TrainBoard Supporter

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    Hank has read my mind perfectly (what little there is of it ;)) and it is those slight difference in track that can be the design killer. Since your idea is small enough, you could test the design at full model scale by obtaining the needed track and lay out the track on the table/floor and see what it would really require. For larger layouts that is when the software packages for layut designes can be extremely helpful in avoiding costly mistakes after many hours of labor have already been put into the project. When doing layouts in sections, you also have to make sure each new section lines up perfectly with the next as you can't cheat at the edges and have a smooth running train.

    :tb-nerd: :tb-nerd: :tb-nerd:​
     
  8. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    I've been reading a lot about track and turnouts. I think a #4 turnout and code 70 track. Am I doing right?
     
  9. Benny

    Benny TrainBoard Member

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    I use Xtrakcad, it's free nad open source - and it has good tutorials.

    I'd only say you want the pair of corssovers, if you can at all make them possible, so that you can create a runaround on the lower track - it will allow the locomotive to get the cars in the right order if your train comes from the "wrong" direction.
     
  10. pjcsea

    pjcsea TrainBoard Member

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    Nit picking: if I was going to place that loading dock I'd shift it towards Summer St. As planned it will be hard to back into the bay closest to the track, with a trailer or a semi regardless, especially if the other bay is occupied. Maybe the model already has the bays as shown, in which case, since this is a train-centric world you can ignore it.

    Plan B: wider alley for the trucks to back down or depart from?

    In any case, older smaller businesses often had to deal with tight situations. Yours certainly doesn't look unrealistic. I think it's a nice scene.
     
  11. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    I made it a bit wider, is this what you mean?
     
  12. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Code 70 track would be realistic for your industrial switching concept. Code 70 track represents a rail height of about 6" (HO) which is lighter (smaller) than modern mainline rail, but appropriate for industry switching locations.

    Turnouts - #4 is also appropriate for your location. However, please carefully research the different track manufacturers because each will have different designs and dimensions for their specific products, i.e. there is no standard design for #4 turnouts. I prefer Peco turnouts because they have a toggle spring which holds the point rail tightly to the stock rail, Whereas the other manufacturers rely on the force of the switch machine (or ground throw) for the point/stock rail pressure.
     
  13. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    Peco sounds good. Where is a good place to order online? I don't have a good hobby store close by.
     
  14. Stourbridge Lion

    Stourbridge Lion TrainBoard Supporter

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    Check out our TrainBoard Advertisors: Online Retail Stores

    :tb-biggrin: :tb-biggrin: :tb-biggrin: :tb-biggrin:​
     
  15. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Candy, this link, http://www.peco-uk.com/Downloads/SL-E191,%20E192.pdf, will give you the dimensions for the Peco HO Small Radius Code 75 Turnout. The diagram does not give a width dimension, but it appears to be a scaled drawing so you should be able to use the scale at the drawing side to determine the width. Of course that assumes your printer doesn't arbitrarily adjust the drawing dimensions to suit its personal printing preferences and peculiarities.

    You can determine the angle of the diverging track by aligning a ruler with final inch or so of the divergent stock rail, and extending a line as far as you need. Though with the industrial siding you show in your drawing, you probably would immediately begin the siding reverse curve at the end of the turnout divergent rails. Rail design engineers occasionally are forced to take some absurd design liberties in order to fit sidings to accomodate customers demands, regardless how ridiculous.....:tb-hissyfit:

    Peco sells Code 75 track, but that's only 0.005" larger than the Code 70 you decided to use. The visual difference between Code 70 and 75 would be noticed only by the most critical (pompous?) rivet-counter.
     
  16. Mike Sheridan

    Mike Sheridan TrainBoard Member

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    Move the turnout toward Summer St a bit and you could put a 2nd turnout in in place of the 'bend' and have a short spur to serve the left hand factory. Would make switching more 'interesting' :)
     
  17. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    I wouldn't know the difference. How come they use 75 instead of 70?
     
  18. BarstowRick

    BarstowRick TrainBoard Supporter

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    Just throwing in to say, "You Go Girl".

    Welcome to TrainBoard.
     
  19. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    I'm not sure how that would work, Mike, can you draw it out and scan it?
     
  20. Candy_Streeter

    Candy_Streeter TrainBoard Member

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    Thank you !!!! :girl_hug:
     

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