GE Locomotive for the UK

Alan Nov 28, 2007

  1. Alan

    Alan Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    UK Freight operator Freightliner has ordered 30 locomotives from GE. At last a competitor for EMD in Europe. :)

    Freightliner order 30 General Electric Genesis JS37ACi locomotives

    Freightliner Group has placed an order for 30 freight locomotives of a new design giving greater hauling capacity and a significant improvement in fuel economy than currently seen on the UK network. Project Genesis, which is being developed in partnership with General Electric (GE), will bring new technology to the UK rail freight market, enabling Freightliner to move longer and heavier trains whilst reducing CO2 emissions per tonne moved.

    Starting in mid 2009, Freightliner will utilise the most advanced locomotive product in the industry while GE - Transportation will enter the UK rail freight market for the first time. The innovative design offers an array of new features, including AC traction technology and dynamic braking. GE - Transportation’s JS37ACi locomotives allow Freightliner to increase its hauling capacity while lowering fuel consumption by an estimated 10 percent compared to the current locos in its fleet.

    This substantial investment, the largest loco order ever placed by Freightliner, fits well with the DfT’s recently published strategy document ‘Towards a sustainable future’ which sets out the transport system's role in supporting continued economic growth and making a key contribution to the Government aim of a 60% CO2 emissions reduction by 2050, The new locomotives enable both economic growth and lower emissions.

    The driving cabs of the new loco will bring new standards of comfort to drivers, with air-conditioning as standard. Freightliner have kept the Trade Unions involved (including RMT and ASLEF) and will involve groups of drivers for input into the design and build of the cab.

    Eddie Fitzsimons, Chief Executive, Freightliner Group Ltd said; “We are extremely excited about Project Genesis. Not only will we improve our carbon footprint but will be able to move more payload per train than ever before. We have been in discussions with GE over recent months to develop what will be the epitome of 21st century locos on the UK network, bringing revolutionary technology the to rail freight market.”

    Robert Parisi, General Manager of International Locomotives and Modernizations, GE - Transportation said; “We are pleased to enter the UK market for the first time and introduce our advanced locomotive product. It’s exciting to provide solutions to our customer’s needs.”

    Tim Shakerley, Engineering Director, Freightliner Group Ltd added; “We recognise that a locomotive is a 30 year asset and therefore development of new technology is important to ensure the locomotive is up to date and relevant for its design life. Packaging this technology into a locomotive compliant to the UK clearance gauge and axle weight is a tremendous challenge but we are confident that GE can achieve this.”


    Technical details
    Body - Narrow Body with exterior walkway
    Length Over Buffers - 23,000 mm
    Height (over operator cab) - 3,917 mm
    Width (over cab sides) - 2,642 mm
    Total Weight - 126 tonnes
    Axle Configuration - Co-Co
    Gross Horsepower - 2750 kW (3686 hp)
    Maximum Speed - 120 kph / 75mph
    Maximum Starting Tractive Effort - 534 kN
    Wheel Diameter - 1,067 mm
    Fuel Capacity (usable) - 6,000 litres / 1320 Gallons
    Engine - GE J616
    Alternator - GE GTA series
    Traction Motors - AC - GE 5GEB30
    Bogies - Fabricated frame with axle hung motors
    Air Brakes - Dynamic Electronic - EAB
    Control System - GE CCA – Common Control Architecture
    Diagnostics -Self Testing with diagnostic display panel

    Traction
    The traction motors are individually controlled via separate inverters. Consequently this leads to better power distribution based on available adhesion and the use of the AC motor with its better torque-speed curve means the loco has a much higher starting torque which means it has a greater starting tractive effort.

    Dynamic Brakes
    The locomotive is fitted with rheostatic (dynamic) brake. When slowing it uses the traction motors to regenerate energy and put electric current back into the locomotive, using the electric current to drive the auxiliary motors. This is the first time it has ever been applied in a diesel loco in the UK.

    Cabs
    Dual cabs with left of centre operator desk, and air conditioning as standard. The engine is resiliently mounted to reduce vibration. Cabs are sound insulated and driver information is provided by MMI screens.

    Fuel efficiencies
    The locomotive is 7% more fuel-efficient than previous locomotives achieving 197g/kwh. By using the energy dissipated by the dynamic brakes to drive the auxiliaries, and controlling the auxiliaries separate from the engine speed, a further 3 % efficiency is gained. It is therefore 10% more efficient than previous locos.

    Diagnostics
    The locomotive will be fitted with remote dial up software which allows GE to monitor the performance, troubleshoot and find problems before anyone knows they are happening, and dispatch a technician with the correct parts to the location where the loco is going to finish its journey for preventative maintenance.
     
  2. OC Engineer JD

    OC Engineer JD Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Sweet! Sounds like the engineers will be happy.:)
     
  3. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    It will be interesting to see these enter service. Perhaps a new paint scheme? Or a current version?

    Boxcab E50
     
  4. RRfan

    RRfan TrainBoard Member

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    can someone show a pic pleas
    what type is the Electro motive Devison locomotives in the UK
    a competitor in the uk i thought RRs compete in the country they are made
    anyways forget the thing i just said just another random thing
    a competitor is a competitor i guess
     
  5. Alan

    Alan Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Alas, we no longer have any locomotive manufacturing in the UK. Which is why our freight operators have been ordering EMD class 66's from Canada in large numbers.

    They are not very highly regarded by the people who have to drive them, or by some of the fitters who maintain them. They have good availability, but the build quality is very poor compared to previous home-built locos. They are beginning to fall apart already.

    So drivers at Freightliner are already very excited about the new locos., they should be much higher specification, especially in terms of cab comfort, having isolated cabs, air conditioning, etc. as standard. They will also be much more powerful so longer trains can be hauled.

    Below is a picture of the EMD 66 in Freightliner colors.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    That's really too bad that EMD isn't giving these 66's the same effort that they put into some of their still very popular offerings, including the GP's ans SD's here in North America.
     
  7. RRfan

    RRfan TrainBoard Member

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    isnt the GP a 60s model
    can you show me a pic of the new GE typs any RR
     
  8. Triplex

    Triplex TrainBoard Member

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    Not really 60s, but the last GP-series were GP60s made in 1994.

    The JS37ACi sounds like it'll be new in another way - a double-ended hood unit for the UK. I know they have such configurations in Ireland and elsewhere, but the only British hood units I know of are (single) end-cab switchers and lighter freight power.
     
  9. Robbman

    Robbman TrainBoard Member

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    They are giving them the same effort... the 70M-2s and 70ACes aren't exactly stellar offerings.
     
  10. Robbman

    Robbman TrainBoard Member

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  11. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    Well, not just a 60's model... what I was referring to more was the extent to which they are still used, not that any are being sold. I know that GP's have been discontinued, but around here the shortlines and BNSF especially have TONS of GP's, including the GP38, GP38-2, GP39-2, and so on.

    The comparison I was making I guess was more between what EMD had been doing in the 1960's and 1970's compared to now, and how they are really burning some bridges if they are losing out on entire markets, such as the freight market in Britain.
     
  12. Triplex

    Triplex TrainBoard Member

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    Doesn't a Class 66 have the same engine and other internal components as a GP59? (And the lookalike predecessor, Class 59?, have GP/SD40-2 internals?)
     
  13. Robbman

    Robbman TrainBoard Member

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    Close, the Class 66 has a 3300hp 12-710G3B-EC, the GP59 just has a 3000 12-710G3 (i.e, the Class 66s are emissions controlled and use revised power assemblies... same as the 70-series)... that's about the only things thats similar... different alternators, etc.

    The Class 59 had much more simialr internals to the lmid-80s built GP/SD40-2s... 16-645E3C, AR11, etc...
     
  14. Thieu

    Thieu TrainBoard Member

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    I thought the Class 66 was based on the SD40? Anyway, I see many of them each day at work, since my office is next to an important mainline. And the Class 66 is an impressive engine, even with that silly small British body. Thanks to deregulation of the freight business, we have many operators these days and the Class 66 was readily available, not too expensive, and strong enough to haul freights by its own, so we have many of those engines around here.
     
  15. Robbman

    Robbman TrainBoard Member

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    Nope... Class 59 was.
     
  16. Mr. SP

    Mr. SP Passed away August 5, 2016 In Memoriam

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    GE's for the UK

    How about an AC44-9CW? Iknow it isn't British looking but is an impressive locomotive.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Thieu

    Thieu TrainBoard Member

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    To accomodate big engines like that, they have to rebuild the entire rail system.......
     
  18. SteamDonkey74

    SteamDonkey74 TrainBoard Supporter

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    That is my understanding. The side and overhead clearances wouldn't permit some of the larger North American and Australian offerings of EMD and GE. Going through the whole country and redoing all the platforms and sidings and tunnels and bridges would just be too much.
     
  19. Thieu

    Thieu TrainBoard Member

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    It is also impossible to bring railroad cars from the continent to Britain: those cars just do not fit on the English tracks.......
     
  20. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    From what I've read from other topics on this Forum, European trains appear to be much shorter/lighter than US and AUS trains, so don't need high horsepower and multiple units.
     

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