1. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    I've build a lot of turnouts, hundreds. The last time I've soldered them.
    Now I want to build a stub switch, just for fun.
    I choose #6, H0n3 and code 70. It will be a simple stub switch, no three-way nor more complicated.

    Has anyone build a stub switch?

    Wolfgang
     
  2. ctxm

    ctxm TrainBoard Member

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    Hi Wolfgang, I built a few for an old time layout.
    The hardest part was making the stops so the rails are indexed correctly. Also need to figure out how to make some insulated cross bars between the throw bar and the last spikes.....dave
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    How To

    Well, here's my How To for a stub switch. I've tot the idea in the latest Model Railroad Hobbyist magazine, there was an article by Tim Warris about a stub switch.


    I'Ve used a template from Fast Track and glued it to a piece of plywood. 5 mm thick, just like the future roadbed. Then I glued PC board ties.

    [​IMG]


    I've soldered a piece of rail with two points. This works as template. I mark the rough position.

    [​IMG]


    Here this job is finished. All future tie plates are marked.

    [​IMG]


    Now I remove with a grinder the thin copper. You see still the spots where I've soldered the rails. This idea I saw at Joe Fugates website.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Here I've soldered the first pieces of rail. I'm working with the frog. the first frog rail is laid, only with one soldered spot. This way it's easy to adjust.

    [​IMG]

    To be continued. :angel:

    Wolfgang
     
  5. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    More work with the frog, closure rails and wing rails.
    The first rail represents closure rail and wing rail in one piece. There's a small notch where I bent the rail. I did it with the rail nipper following an video from Fast Tracks.
    The two rails for the frog are sharpened with my table saw with grinding disk. This is a fast and easy way.

    [​IMG]


    Here's the second rail, already notched for the wing rail part.

    [​IMG]


    Here're the ends of the fixed rails. To get a "bumper" for the moving rails I soldered a joint bar to the tie. I've got the idea from a prototype picture. http://lh6.ggpht.com/_Ugq9IKOMBTI/Rq0SMlLenZI/AAAAAAAABAw/HOgZp9VzM2g/IMG_0672.JPG

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Now the movable rails are soldered.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Next step will be the "throw bar".

    Wolfgang
     
  7. DSP&P fan

    DSP&P fan TrainBoard Member

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    Yep. I've built a few...some of which were replacements. It took me three tries to get my 3-way stub switch right. The first was without soldering (a mistake). The second was fine except that made it slightly too sharp. The third is a champ. Mine are On3 with Code 100 rail. My 2nd stub was with C83...by accident. I've also laid a code 70 or 80 HOn3 stub switch...but that was years ago.

    Here are the two on my current layout:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    You have some nice ideas in this thread. I'll incorporate them into my future turnouts. Note that mine don't currently have throw bars installed. I have beautiful Grandt Line castings, but haven't gotten around to building the switch stands.

    Thanks for posting a link in the ng forum!

    Michael
     
  8. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Well, the problem is moving the rails and have an end stop.

    Here're the next steps.

    At first I've prepared a throw bar. I choose the PROTO:87 STORES throw bar. But I had only the standard gauge. So I shortened it. Narrow gauge is 6,0 mm smaller than standard gauge. And I glued at the end pieces of the throw bar with CA. This way I get the thickness of the PC board ties.

    [​IMG]


    Here's the throw bar at between the ties. At the left side the "big" hole for the actuation rod. You see also I've drilled at the base of the rail 0,5 mm holes. This is the place where the fret comes.

    [​IMG]


    Here're the two frets inserted. Also I had to make a new hole for one fret, 6,0 mm more to the other side. And so I used only half of the fret. Narrow gauge!

    [​IMG]


    Same step with birds view. You see two spikes. These give a stop for the moving rails. The base from the rail will glide under the head of the spike.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Like you see at the PROTO:87 site, you get two "throw bars". I did so too. But the second throw bar is a fake.

    [​IMG]


    Now I cut with a fine saw through the rails to separate the frog from the closure rails.

    [​IMG]


    Then I added more detail parts like joint bars.

    [​IMG]

    Wolfgang
     
  10. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    More work:


    According to the PROTO:87 instructions I've used the paper and placed it over the frets.

    [​IMG]


    Now I painted the rails brown and the top of the paper black to simulate the prototype throw bars.

    [​IMG]


    Next step: ballast and some basic scenery. I "lifted" the throw bar (easy with a stub switch) to prevent gluing.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Now, the switch stand is missing ! Next time.

    Wolfgang
     
  11. DSP&P fan

    DSP&P fan TrainBoard Member

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    Sehr gut, Wolfgang!

    There should be a series of those...tie bars I believe is the correct term...to maintain the gauge on the 20' or so of unspiked rail leading to the stubs. With code 70 rail, the appropriate switch stand would be a ratchet type...
    http://grandtline.com/images/quarter%20inch/3000%27s/3021.jpg

    I can't recall the cut off, but I believe that it was something like 55lb rail was the heaviest which could be thrown with a harp switchstand.
    Walthers Model Railroad Mall -- product information page for 585-31472
    Of course, that isn't stopping me from using harp switch stands with my 75lb rail!
     
  12. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Well, I have one of those harp switch stands left over. I will use it. This turnout has so many mistakes, one more. Who cares?

    But this gives me the idea, if I should ever build something with H0n3 track, it will be next time code 55 !!

    Wolfgang
     
  13. gregamer

    gregamer TrainBoard Supporter

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    Nice work. Thank you for the How-To.

    It took me a few read throughs to figure out what a stub-switch was. But from what I see it looks like the point rails are stationary and the approach rails move.

    Thanks again.
     
  14. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Here're the last pictures. Now someone can install it into the layout. Still there's the need for a Tortoise or other device. You need a switch for frog polarity.

    With narrow gauge, for a spur, I've added some weeds to the track, too.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Like I wrote, manually operated.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Wolfgang
     
  15. Wolfgang Dudler

    Wolfgang Dudler Passed away August 25, 2012 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Two close up pictures.
    At first, joint bars next to the frog:

    [​IMG]

    Moving rails.

    [​IMG]

    Wolfgang
     
  16. ctxm

    ctxm TrainBoard Member

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    Hi Wolfgang, Looks great. I'd suggest it might work easier if you let the two diverging rails come closer together before stopping them. I've found that the shorter the throw the better as it puts less bending stress on the parts. I use a wheelset as a gauge and just leave enough space for the flanges to clear the other route....dave
     

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