TRYING TO IDENTIFY GERMAN CLASS 52 TENDER

ZOPTIONS Feb 26, 2021

  1. ZOPTIONS

    ZOPTIONS TrainBoard Member

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    Greetings, Does anyone have an idea what this tender did - operationally? Fans, condensers etc pus coal. Pin is a Marklin example. Tender is a 10 wheeler, German DB52 I think. Did wiki and unable to find the tender. Plenty of locs though. I need an idea of how it worked and a name or class of tender. Thanks Mac.

    GERMAN 10 WHEEL TENDER s-l1600.jpg
     
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  2. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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  3. ZOPTIONS

    ZOPTIONS TrainBoard Member

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    Scott, WOW! Great job searching. What an engineering 'marvel' - whether it worked on not. I will take your base search and go from there. Thanks Again! Mac
     
  4. CNE1899

    CNE1899 TrainBoard Member

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    ZOPTIONS,
    Yeah, German engineering can be impressive and intricate.
    I love doing research. Glad I can help.
    Scott
     
  5. ZOPTIONS

    ZOPTIONS TrainBoard Member

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    Scott - Update - Looks like they were 'deployed' mainly in So Africa.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_type_CL_tender

    "The tender was designed for a Deutsche Reichsbahn Class 52 condensing locomotive. It was modified slightly and was equipped with a pair of Buckeye three-axle bogies instead of the German arrangement of one six-wheeled and one four-wheeled bogie. It had an 11 long tons (11.2 tonnes) coal capacity, a 3,900 imperial gallons (17,700 litres; 4,680 US gallons) water capacity which included the underbelly condensate tank, and a 13 long tons 17 hundredweight 3 quarters (14,110 kilograms) maximum axle load. The tender was capable of condensing 27,000 pounds (12,000 kilograms) of exhaust steam per hour in maximum operating temperatures of between 100 and 110 degrees Fahrenheit (38 and 43 degrees Celsius). The tender had six large radiators on each side, cooled by three exhaust steam-driven roof-mounted fans which drew air from outside through the radiators"

    It had buckeye bogies and had a 'stealth' attribute because it 'consumed' the smokes as well (some say).

    Anyway, Thanks for the lead into my research!
    Mac
     
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  6. Texrail

    Texrail New Member

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    Mac,
    this Tender was used in WWII for lokomotives during the Invasion of Russia in order to expand the travel distance without watering, as the russian infrastructure was distroyed very often. After WWII, these types of tender were useless in Germany. But the Railroads in East- and West Germany had to use what they could find after the more or less complete damage of lokomotives and tenders.
    Best regards, Ingo
     
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  7. ZOPTIONS

    ZOPTIONS TrainBoard Member

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    Ingo, Thanks for the further update. I had suspicions that the roots were from WWII but not in wiki? or I just am missing something. Mac
     
  8. eXact Modellbau

    eXact Modellbau TrainBoard Member

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    Hi folks
    However, the recovery of water was not the only effect. Especially in the cold season, a steam locomotive causes a steam plume that can be seen from afar. That could be reduced to a minimum.
     
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  9. ZOPTIONS

    ZOPTIONS TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks Larry. Since I started this inquiry, I DID find that there was a 'stealth' component to the thinking behind this remarkable engineering feat. Mac
     
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