What motor is this from?

Bill Debevc Feb 3, 2022

  1. Bill Debevc

    Bill Debevc New Member

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    Hello I picked up a Varney Diesel Locomotive off the Ebay. I knew when I bid it was non-running and "parts only." It did however have this motor assembly in it and that still runs. Any ideas of where the motor assembly came from?
     
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  2. Mr. Trainiac

    Mr. Trainiac TrainBoard Member

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    It comes from a Tyco F unit. This is one of the earlier versions before they started making everything out of plastic. After the Consolidated Foods buyout, there was a noticeable decline in quality.

    I have seen one or two of them, I think their biggest flaw from a mechanical design perspective is the rivet that holds the coupler. There is no way to swap the coupler without drilling it out, and plenty of these train set locomotives end up with broken couplers after sliding around in an empty box for 50+ years.
     
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  3. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member

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    Is that a Cary metal F unit shell?
     
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  4. Bill Debevc

    Bill Debevc New Member

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    Thank you. That solves that issue. Now I need to remake the main frame that holds it all together. If there is interest can make a build log showing how I rebuilt this thing. Even though it as the wrong parts.
     
  5. Bill Debevc

    Bill Debevc New Member

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    I says underneath the shell Varney 1940
     

    Attached Files:

  6. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member

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    Yep Varney Pretty early 1940. Cary also made a metal, similar but not same. I wonder if you could slip an Athearn Blue Box F unit power chassis under that? You would have a lot better running unit. I have used Cary shells before, but not Varney.
     
  7. Bill Debevc

    Bill Debevc New Member

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    When I was little I had a Athearn loco that was wonderful. It would coast for ever it seemed. I really don't have the room anywhere to put up a track layout. It's going to be a shelf loco, but I hope to make it at least run.
     
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  8. gjslsffan

    gjslsffan Staff Member

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    Yessir, the flywheel drive Athearn power chassis would have coasted a bit.
     
  9. Bill Debevc

    Bill Debevc New Member

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  10. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    The way the Tycos were made is there wasn't any separate frame/chassis. The trucks were held into the shell with long screws on each side going up into the shell. These were the earliest ones until about the mid sixties and then, Tyco had the truck assemblies attached to a metal plate which had extensions on the sides which snapped into slots on the shell. These slots are easily seen on later units.

    It's possible to remove the rivet holding the coupler pocket together by squeezing the rivet slightly so it will pull through holes and then replacing it after, say, a broken coupler is replaced. I have done it a few times.

    These trucks were used on the GP20 locos, too, and others.

    Tyco locos are still fairly common on eBay and other venues.

    Doug
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2022
  11. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    BTW, that diagram is for the rarer twin powered version. The more usual single powered version just has a power truck on the rear and the front truck just picks up current. The front truck has a bracket that is screwed, similarly, into the shell.

    Doug
     
  12. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    That sheet metal coupler pocket sure dates it. Haven't seen one of those since I was a kid!
     
  13. Doug Gosha

    Doug Gosha TrainBoard Member

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    Yup, early to mid sixties at the latest.

    Doug
     
  14. Chops

    Chops TrainBoard Member

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    The history of early RTR HO is always interesting. Great insights here. I don't know much, but instantly recognized the Tyco MU 2 motor. All the replies here regarding the motor are entirely correct, and need no augmentation. I will say, however, that the MU2 is a rugged motor, not great for low speed running (3 pole?), but stands up to the test of time. That riveted coupler is a real pain.
     
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