Articulated Locomotives (HO Virginian 2-8-8-2)

fitz Jun 10, 2001

  1. watash

    watash Passed away March 7, 2010 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    I think this shows the fantastic interest there is about an articulated engine.

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  2. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    Watash,
    I have no idea where or how you got that picture of the articulation on that....What is that a N&W ??? But that is a wild picture!!! Ha Man does the curve he's setting on show the articulation or what!!!!!!! :D I like that as well....... And I believe it to be a rare articulated picture! HA :D

    [ 10 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  3. watash

    watash Passed away March 7, 2010 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    John, I'm not sure where the above photo was taken, Martinsville, West Virginnia I think, about 1949. I borrowed a friends Kodak and the photos came back with some sort of texture instead of the usual glossy surface. The front set of drivers have swung to the right as far as they will safely go. It was making a terrible squeeling of flanges when backing into this curve. I just stepped out in front to get this, then went back out of the way, because another one was backing in behind me! All very slow. :D
     
  4. watash

    watash Passed away March 7, 2010 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    Here is one most people will never see.
    "Safey" Engines, or Compressed Air engines are not used in ordinary railway service, but are used by many large manufgacturing plants on account of the absence of smoke, which renders it feasible to run them inside buildings where operations are being carried on to which fire or smoke would be fatal. Many of them are also used in coal mines in preference to electric cars, and where live steam could not be used because of the smoke and fire. Compressed air engines also furnish an additional supply of fresh air in the mine. They are used on cotton plantations, and especially in cotton compress warehouses and storage yards. In some of these engines, the air is pressed through hot water tanks which increases the efficiency of the air.

    The photo is of a mining engine built by the Dickson Locomotive Works at Scranton, Pa. It stands five feet tall. The drivers are 26" diameter and the cylinders are 9" x 16". It weighs 16 tons, and stores air at 600 PSI with a working pressure of 125 PSI. The tank holds 170 cubic feet. There is no need for a fireman. Most engines of this type were 0-4-0, but this one is an 0-6-0, and fitted for link and pin coupling in 1905. The rivits are 1-1/4" diameter at the body and assembled with doublers, similar to the method used on aircraft today. They sound like a steam engine running.

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  5. bnsf4354

    bnsf4354 TrainBoard Member

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    Here are a couple more gorgeous articulateds.

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  6. Alan

    Alan Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Good pics! Gorgeous, indeed [​IMG] Is that a Shay on the flatcar behind the 3985? Interesting train [​IMG]
     
  7. fitz

    fitz Staff Member

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    Alan, it depends upon when that photo was taken. I don't see any new cars in the photo, so it may have been back in 1991 or thereabouts, when UP used to drag the 1243 around to various places such as Railfair 91. I can't remember if 1243 was a ten-wheeler, 2-6-2, or what? :confused:
    And bnsf, I know that roster shooters got their photos when they could and couldn't always compose them the way they would like. Your Camelback 0-8-0 has a water spout growing out of it forward of the stack. That could be used for a number of humorous applications. "Fill me up on the run." :D
     
  8. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    BNSF,
    I love the Allegheny 2-6-6-6.... Great picture man! HA! Also the Challenger looks be hauling a Shay.. Very possible look at the boiler and see if its cetered or if its off set on the frame.. That will tell everyone if its a Shay or not!!!! :D

    I'm not much on the UP but those excursion colors are sweet... I will admit that was a nice paint scheme!!! :D If this thread hasn't died... KEEP 'EM COMMIN! I'll go find a few of my own....

    Oh that spout on the camelback... Thats for road crew emergency refill on the water bottle.... :D Long runs I guess huh guy??? :D

    [ 17 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  9. Gregg Mahlkov

    Gregg Mahlkov Guest

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    The UP 1243 is a Ten-Wheeler (4-6-0). A brass model was imported in HO about a quarter century ago. I note in the photo that UP has painted the Vanderbilt tender in the prewar scheme with the "Overland" shield and engine number. :cool:
     
  10. fitz

    fitz Staff Member

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    Here's a shot of 1243 (and 4449) at Railfair '91. I'm not sure she ever got off that flat for the show. We left early. Gregg, sorry I didn't get the tender in this one. Looking at the 3985 shot, I'm pretty sure I can read 1243 and can see rods on the LH side of the engine, therefore not a Shay. John, sorry, that's YOUR photo of the tanker 0-8-0, not bnsf's. :eek: [​IMG]
     
  11. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    Guys,
    Its easy to tell that #1243 is a rod engine and not a Shay.. Look at the pilot and right dead behind that you'll see 2 cylinders! HA! Only rod engines had those their... If it were a Shay the cylinders would be on the left side (pictire side) and you wouldn't be able to see them, A Heisler from that picture you'd see both cylinders... angled in from the sides.. And a climax.. almost like they are now just at a 45 degree angle from the front... Very simple..... :D Nice picture of the Daylight i'll admit!!!! HA ! :D

    [ 18 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  12. bnsf4354

    bnsf4354 TrainBoard Member

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    I can't believe we have 11 pages now on this post, not even counting the other 8 or so on the original one I started in the HO forum. Steam is alive and well! In our hearts at least.

    [ 19 July 2001: Message edited by: bnsf4354 ]</p>
     
  13. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    To get to the 12th page I got some more pictures to add!!!! :D

    Here we have a mallet by the Western Maryland.... A 2-8-8-2... Odd for the Western Maryland though! They were famous for their Challengers.... Its cab number 916, not to many of these are picture kept so..... Enjoy the rare ones of the road!!! HA! :D


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    And the second picture of a Western Maryland 2-8-8-2's. Even though they had more, only 3 pictures of the loco, I can find!!! Number 919.

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    And the 3rd and last picture of the Western Maryland 2-8-8-2's.. Number 906..... :D

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    [ 19 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  14. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    Ok, guys.... Some more Western Maryland power.....

    This one, once was a 2-6-6-2 and the WM amputated the front and rear trucks for yard service... So Now its a 0-6-6-0.... Other then the pilot and trailing trucks removed its unchanged to what it looked like originally....

    Western Maryland number 953...

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    And another and last picture of the WM's 2-6-6-2's reconfined as 0-6-6-0's.... Number 954... :D

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    ENJOY!!!

    [ 19 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  15. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    And for todays posts.... I'm including a few pictures of the Western Marylands.. "Fireball" paint scheme.... :D First off we have an "I-2" 2-10-0, One of WM's finests......

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    And a "H-9" class 2-8-0 WM...

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    Next will be their passenger power... 4-6-2's.. "K" class without the "Fireball" scheme... To compare.... :D

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    ENJOY once again..... :D

    [ 19 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  16. watash

    watash Passed away March 7, 2010 TrainBoard Supporter In Memoriam

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    John did you notice the rear cylinders have the flat plate slide valves like the front ones? Those are REALLY OLD engines. They are Mallet's compound design. Later versions were equipped with round piston type valves on the rear set, and still "Malleys". The later versions than that went to high pressure on both front and rear which made them Articulateds with round valves all around. Those old flat valve engines were powerful but slow. You could hear the exhaust "Bark" for miles in the mountains under heavy loads! Those were the days! [​IMG]
     
  17. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    Watash,
    Yes I did notice that. And I know their way older then most we've been posting being most of the ones we've posted were made in the early to middle 1940's, the ones here are like in the 1900's to 1920's I believe.

    I also know they were powerfull! But as I hear and understand the way they worked was like this:

    On the true "Mallets" the rear set of drivers had to slip for a time to get the steam presure through them and up to the front set of drivers to begin pulling.....Which was hard on the rail and on the wheels that were slipping... Also created a rough ride for the crew... I've been told that the engineers and crewmen never liked them for that reason being that they had to slip the drivers and so on, and caused extra need for maintenence. About this time is when the railroads (most of them anyway) began experiments on the articulated ones were all the drivers both sets got presure to all 4 cylinders and no slipping was needed to get it going and ran alot smoother then the true Mallets did! And also wasn't so rough on the rail and its wheels, specially the tire itself, thus after so long the railroads machine shops had alot of resweating on tires onto the wheel itself from all the wear of slipping.... Thats when the articulateds then reasured the railroads to be better and that began a whole new ball game being it cut maintenence in half which cut the cost to run the railroad successfully....... :D

    [ 19 July 2001: Message edited by: 7600EM_1 ]</p>
     
  18. fitz

    fitz Staff Member

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    Hey John or Watash, do either of you have any idea what the diameter of the front low-pressure cylinders was on those 2-8-8-2's?? They look enormous. :eek:
     
  19. 7600EM_1

    7600EM_1 Permanently dispatched

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    Fitz,
    I know their either 36 inches or bigger maybe even 48 inches... I'm not real sure... Watash???? :D
     
  20. bnsf4354

    bnsf4354 TrainBoard Member

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    How about another view of an articulated articulating!

    [​IMG] :D

    [ 22 July 2001: Message edited by: bnsf4354 ]</p>
     

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