"Insert train here..."

HemiAdda2d Sep 11, 2020

  1. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    You're correct, built in 1973 and originally owned by the SCL, they sound GREAT, with a wonderful 4-cycle rhythm almost like Alcos. They're beautifully maintained. Business is so good that the PICK acquired a CSX B40-8, originally CR. GE fans it seems. :)

    2021-09-03 004 Belton SC - for upload.jpg

    2021-09-03 PICK 5970 Belton SC - for upload.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2021
  2. Grey One

    Grey One TrainBoard Supporter

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    @Mr. Trainiac Yes, thank you! Now I know. ☻ And yes, I misread / mis-googled 'pickens'.
     
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  3. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Interesting they kept the same name, for an unrelated operation.
     
  4. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yes. I built and repaired many PD boxcars back then.
     
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  5. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    It is. Perhaps they figured that the Pickens name had good regional recognition and wanted to carry on with it. The crew was friendly. They probably see a lot of fans.

    In other South Carolina shortline news, the highly successful 62-Mile Lancaster & Chester is gaining a new customer. The E. & J. Gallo Winery will soon start construction of a $423 Million production and distribution facility on the L&C. The road already handles in excess of 11,600 cars a year and my friend at the L&C said that Gallo will provide a welcome addition to their traffic. (y) Not only is the L&C in a state of continual growth, but their traffic base is well diversified, with steel, petroleum, grain .... and soon wine. :) The L&C interchanges with both NS and CSX and is in a sweet location.
     
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  6. HemiAdda2d

    HemiAdda2d Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Tennessee Pass tour continues... Looking at the east switch of Belden Siding. The west switch is deep within the nearly inaccessible Eagle River canyon.

    _MG_5034.jpg
     
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  7. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Those signals look like Vaders. Are they of another type, preceding PTC Vaders we see everywhere today?
     
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  8. HemiAdda2d

    HemiAdda2d Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    GRS Type D. The sidings along most of the Pueblo-Dotsero route are largely equipped with searchlights instead of Ds.
     
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  9. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    They were still in use when UP shut down the Tennessee Pass route. They are now heavily vandalized but still standing.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  10. Hardcoaler

    Hardcoaler TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks for the interesting signal history Hemi. I've never understood why people find joy in vandalizing signals. The dwarf below was found at Melrose, NC at the foot of the Saluda Grade and it was one of several, all ruined. :(

    2017-07-28 002 Melrose NC - for upload.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2021
  11. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    Abandoned Boston & Maine tracks. Just south of West Stewartstown, New Hampshire near Beecher Falls, Vermont. North of Groveton off the Grand Trunk. June 1969.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Kurt Moose

    Kurt Moose TrainBoard Member

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    Wow, that's some good lookin' country up there.
     
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  13. BoxcabE50

    BoxcabE50 HOn30 & N Scales Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Looks super-elevated. Trains once had some speed through here?
     
  14. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    I doubt it. There is a lot going on in this image and it is hard to determine what is level. Especially when shooting a photo through a view finder. The photo is looking east across the Connecticut River valley, which runs more or less from north to south, so the foreground terrain is probably sloping down on the right. The ridge of hills on the horizon could be doing anything. Assuming that the gate post standing on the right is more or less vertical and the roof line in the distance is horizontal, I re-leveled the image and cropped it. The tracks appear more level now.
    index.jpg
     
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  15. Grey One

    Grey One TrainBoard Supporter

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    Snow covered branches vs rails 2K  20210219_143757.jpg
    Ooops. I just re-read this.
    Yes, I have quite a few. Ironically couple years ago I got dissed for posting an empty station which I had caught at just *that* moment.

    I like how the branches contrasted with the rail.
    Taken from my window last winter.

    Edit: deleted identical photos.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 14, 2021
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  16. digimar52

    digimar52 TrainBoard Member

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    Just stumbled over this video on YT that should answer your question:
     
  17. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks.

    Of course, this brings into question the New York City subway and the ex-New York Central third rail systems, both of which use 600Volt DC. Why do they not worry about galvanic corrosion with nearby underground iron structures?
     
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  18. r_i_straw

    r_i_straw Mostly N Scale Staff Member

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    Because they developed sub soil galvanic voltaic turbo vortex generators to counteract any current that would attack any other infrastructure. That and the fact that NYC uses wooden water and sewer pipes.
     
  19. Grey One

    Grey One TrainBoard Supporter

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    @r_i_straw Great! explanation. I feel better already. ☻
     
  20. Mike VE2TRV

    Mike VE2TRV TrainBoard Member

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    The Montreal Metro uses 750 VDC since its opening in 1966. It runs on rubber tires rolling on concrete base tracks, with some smaller horizonal wheels keeping everything in line against the concrete guide rails off to the sides. The standard-gauge rails carry the juice, and can also serve as guides over switches and in case tires blow out. The whole shebang was inspired by the Paris Metro.

    They currently have seven district substations that transform 12.5 kV (older installations) or 25 kV (newer ones) into the DC operating voltage.

    Everything around is concrete or other non-conductive materials. And since the rails are not referenced to ground, no corrosion occurs.
     
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