Working on the Railway - Sydney style

Sten Nov 3, 2005

  1. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    I would change the name of this topic if I could
    oh well new name "Working on the Railway - Sydney style"
    spent all day in the Carlingford Line, which is a short branch line running from the main west line at Clyde to the northwest suburb of Carlingford. This line is like a step back in time, the whole CityRail Network uses a system called Rail Vehicle Detection System (RVDS) for a method of train protection. basically track circuits control the automatic signals to prevent 2 trains from occupying the same block.
    The first pic is of the Starting signal at Rosehill on the Carlingford line. This is the last signal the driver will see until returning to this point. the method that prevents this signal from being cleared while the train is in the section is by an axle counter (which is located just past the signal facing the other direction) in this case, my train being a 4 car train with 2, 2 axle bogies = 16 axles, it counts 16 axles out and has to count 16 axles coming back, if not (the train has a problem......) the signal will not clear and has to be reset.
    [​IMG]
    The second shot just out of Carlingford is of the Distant landmark (The triangle on the pole)
    This is placed with sufficient braking distance from a point a driver has to stop (in this case - buffer beams and the end of the track)
    You may also notice that the rails are painted white, this is a trial in heat resistance methods - trying to keep the ambient temp of the rail down during periods of hot weather, which may cause misalignments
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Colonel

    Colonel Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Well I can and I did :D
     
  3. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    I just noticed that...... COOL!!!!
     
  4. JASON

    JASON TrainBoard Supporter

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    Not having a go at you Sten,but you gotta question that idea of white paint to cut down on the heat....... [​IMG]
    I mean its the expansion of the steal through heat soak that causes it,dont think it will reflect enough heat to stop heat soak,at least during the middle of an Aussie summer.
    Maybe they should look at a Kato slip joint gap adjuster thingy [​IMG]
     
  5. Gats

    Gats TrainBoard Member

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    Those Kato slip joint gap adjuster thingies exist, Jason. There's two sets of four (set each end) on the Medway Viaduct of the CTRL on 300 km/h rated track, and are used throughout the UK system.

    Work very well they do. [​IMG]
     
  6. Colonel

    Colonel Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    They are also in use here in Sydney on several bridges, however the painting of the rails does have quite an impact on heat reduction.
     
  7. Alan

    Alan Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Imagine white rails on a model railway :eek: That would raise a few eyebrows :D
     
  8. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    ain't having a go at me.... it ain't my train set. I'm just one of those expensive plastic figures you stick in the train for added reality :D
    this application on the Carlo is the first in the Metro, I have already seen it on the Main South around Yass and heading towards Harden. If it didn't work there then there wouldn't be a take 2. As would be expected there would be a fair amount of testing involved - to see how much difference there is in the temps. That would probably be why they chose the Carlingford branch, the trains are hourly so plenty of time to play without disturbing normal operations - either for the good or the bad (depending on how you see it) we've only had one WOLO day (4 letter word used by railways to say it is hot and you have to reduce speed by 10km/h to a max of 90km/h) so far so I assume there hasn't been to much testing done.
     
  9. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    hey all,

    headed up to Hornsby in Sydney's north last week, while sitting in the sidings, this PN intermodal came through with 3 GE NRclass locos on the point.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Forgive me for a wandering mind, but.....

    With so much electric territory, has anyone considered putting pantographs on the diesels so they can draw power from the wires and shut down the diesels.....? It might save fuel, because power plants are more efficient than individual engines.

    OK, so it's just a brain f-rt, but hey.........? :confused:

    P.S. Sten, those are great photos, and I for one really appreciate your posting them!!! [​IMG]
     
  11. Flash Blackman

    Flash Blackman TrainBoard Member

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    I went to Sydney many times. I remember cantenary types or diesel electrics, but I don't remember combinations of the two. I don't know how far cantenary extends beyond Sydney and the freights do go far beyond the Sydney boundaries.

    Great seeing the pictures, Sten. Good memories.
     
  12. Alan

    Alan Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Sten, is that bi-directional track the intermodal is on? The signs appear to indicate speed limits of 45 over the crossings and 70 on the main? Kmph?

    Great picture [​IMG]
     
  13. Colonel

    Colonel Staff Member TrainBoard Supporter

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    Yes your 100% correct Alan
     
  14. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks Hytec,

    as to dual locos, they have never been developed here and probably never will, the main reason being cost. The freight operator hires the path to run the train (the access charge) and then using electricity is an extra charge.... so basically it is cheaper to run diesels. As for CityRail and it's fleet of Electrics... well we own the tracks, so it is more an internal paper shuffle from CityRail to Infrastructure within RailCorp. secondly, all suburban trains run in the underground so a big no no on smelly diesels in there.
     
  15. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    thanks Alan,

    as Paul said, correct, as to why they have a 70 there I don't know. The bi-di is only within Hornsby's "Yard Limits *see blurb so the driver will be doing 70 through the platform then braking for the crossover at the other end. There are a few speed boards around like that. There is one where there is a 50 then a 30, 5metres behind it.


    *Yard Limits refers to the areas where a signaller has control over signals and interlockings. There are 2 basic types of signal - automatic - works of track circuits only the signal heads are staggered they are permissive in nature in that a driver can pass an automatic signal at stop on his/her own authority. and the other is "Controlled" which are controlled by signallers who "set" the road for the train, they also work off the track circuits as well to ensure a signaller can't put 2 trains in one block. Controlled signals are Absolute by nature in that the driver must have signaller authority to pass the signal at stop and the signal heads are in line with each other. The setup for a basic yard for signals is as follows. As the driver comes out of an automatic section the first signal he sees is the "Accept" signal. This is controlled by the signaller and is as it says, it accepts the train into yard limits and there is a plate on the signal with the letters "YL" The next signal is the "Home" signal. The definition of a home signal is "a signal that protects a permanent risk" in most cases this is a set of points or an interlocking - being that the signal and the points are"interlocked" to prevent conflicting movements. The last signal is the "Starting" signal. This is the last controlled signal in the yard. The next signal is an automatic which will have the letters "EYL" or End Yard Limits.
    If there is alot of space between interlockings within yard limits then the block will be broken up into smaller blocks. The signal type protecting these blocks (but not an interlocking) is called the "Outer Home" which will have the letters "OH" on a plate on the signal.
    whoa That's a bit to take in......
     
  16. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    Thanks Flash,

    The overhead goes to Newcastle which is 168kms north of Sydney. Newcastle is on a branch line from km peg 163 which is at Woodville Jcnt (where some of Pauls pics were taken. The main line heads to the left and the branch goes right, after that point the main is not electrified. This train is heading to Brisbane, QLD. In the old days they used to run electrics to Broadmeadow (yard just south of Woodville Jcnt) and change over, but some consultants came over from the States (a firm called Booze Allan and Co.) and wrote a rpt, sadly it's the same one UP used - build a train in one yard and the next time it stops is it's destination. and that is what that train does, it is put together at Chullora in Sydney and runs non stop to Acacia Ridge in Brisbane.
     
  17. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    let's break up those slabs of words with a picture.
    My train on the northern approach to Sydney Harbour Bridge
    [​IMG]
     
  18. Hytec

    Hytec TrainBoard Member

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    Sten, now you have me totally confused.....

    1) You say "my train", so I assume that you are the driver.
    2) I see a green signal forward of the far locomotive, so I assume you are left-hand running towards the bridge.

    So, what are you, as the driver, doing in the fourth locomotive taking a picture????? :confused:

    Also, do you have any photos that show those locos from the side? They look impressive given the angle of the photo, and what appears to be all stainless skin.

    BTW, nice looking bridge. It looks similar to the Hell Gate Bridge near New York City on Amtrak's Northeast Corridor.
     
  19. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    Hey Hytec,

    No I'm a Guard or as you say in the states a Conductor, basically the 2nd person on the train. Unlike most Conductors I have seen in the States we don't concern ourselves with revenue protection (That's the job of the Transit Officers or Railway Police) The guards job on a simple day is basically to open/close doors make announcements and customer service stuff, ensure safe arrival and departure from stations, prepare trains for service and stable trains after completion of service, and basically keep the train on time.
    On a bad day, other tasks also include, winding failed points, flagging the train across a failed level crossing (There are 13 left in the Metro area), if the driver is incapacitated then drive the train to the next station in advance, passenger evacuations (to track if required), first aid, In the advent of a derailment, protect the train from other trains by the use of track circuit shortening clips (look like jumper cables - clipped onto the rails to set the signal to stop) or placement of detonators, and fire fighting
    The Guards position with CityRail is quite important for a number of reasons,
    CityRail has a policy of passenger containment, meaning in the advent of an emergency there is no way for them to egress (exit the train) without assistance from outside, and the trains aren't fitted with Traction Interlocking (the trains ability to power with the doors open) so it is only the guards eyes that prevent people from getting caught in the doors (esp on curved platforms)
    That brings me to the last bit (my location on the train) We are required by rule to operate 8 car trains from the 5th position crew compartment, the train being made of 2 four car sets the passengers on the rear 4 cars must be able to access a crew member.

    the last bit - all of Australia is left hand running
     
  20. Sten

    Sten TrainBoard Member

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    The first pic is of an R set stabled at Richmond. This train is of the same design as the train crossing the harbour bridge
    [​IMG]
    The second is of a PN steel train heading south through Liverpool
    [​IMG]
     

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